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Outlaw Women

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Kelsey
Post Posted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 12:52 am
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Joined: 11 Jan 2006
Posts: 133
The International Women's Day was established to commemorate the struggles and accomplishments of women activists who have fought for more just and equal social structures throughout the world. These dedicated individuals are true outlaw women.

http://www.uncharted.ca/content/view/88/35/
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Elvis
Post Posted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 1:24 am

Joined: 01 Feb 2006
Posts: 661
Location: Toronto
Atu, you freak me out with how much info you can pack into one piece! Great stuff.

I had to quote something from the linked Angelina Grimke speech... which was awesome (I felt like I was there clapping, while a mob of idiots was protesting around me).

Quote:
Each one present has a work to do, be his or her situation what it may, however limited their means, or insignificant their supposed influence. The great men of this country will not do this work; the church will never do it. A desire to please the world, to keep the favor of all parties and of all conditions, makes them dumb on this and every other unpopular subject. They have become worldly-wise, and therefore God, in his wisdom, employs them not to carry on his plans of reformation and salvation. He hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise, and the weak to overcome the mighty.


Almost 200 years ago. wow.

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Henri Ducard: Your compassion is a weakness your enemies will not share.
Bruce Wayne: That's why it's so important. It separates us from them.
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blackcat
Post Posted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 3:14 am

Joined: 03 Feb 2006
Posts: 17
Lucy Parsons "more dangerous than a thousand rioters"



The life of Lucy Parsons and the struggles for peace and justice she engaged provide remarkable insight about the history of the American labor movement and the anarchist struggles of the time. Born in Texas, 1853, probably as a slave, Lucy Parsons was an African, Native and Mexican-American anarchist labor activist who fought against the injustices of poverty, racism, capitalism and the state her entire life. After moving to Chicago with her husband, Albert, in 1873, she began organizing workers and led thousands of them out on strike protesting poor working conditions, long hours and abuses of capitalism. After Albert, along with seven other anarchists, were eventually imprisoned or hung by the state for their beliefs in anarchism, Lucy Parsons achieved international fame in their defense and as a powerful orator and activist in her own right. The impact of Lucy Parsons on the history of the American anarchist and labor movements has served as an inspiration spanning now three centuries of social movements.

While most people remember Lucy Parsons in relation to the events surrounding her husband, Albert Parsons, and their comrades' executions (known as the Haymarket affair), Lucy's own legacy and passions have a long and courageous life history all their own. Lucy was known for her writings, her courage as a dissident woman of color, her unbending commitment to social justice, and, most of all, her powerful, fiery public speeches. She led tens of thousands of workers into the streets in mass protests, drew enormous crowds wherever she spoke and was considered a dangerous, explosive and robust threat to authorities across the United States. For over 30 years her lectures were shut down by the police, often arresting her before she ever reached the podium. Hearing Lucy speak at all was a rare opportunity that sparked a passion for rebellion in working and poor people from coast to coast. The Chicago police labeled Lucy Parsons "more dangerous than a thousand rioters."

Lucy made her living as a dress maker, spending the remainder of her time raising her 2 children and constantly working on behalf of a plethora of social justice causes. Much of her time was devoted to free speech fights by default, as her own ability to speak, like her executed husband, was always at stake. She also dedicated herself to the struggles of African-Americans, as in the case of the Scottsboro Eight in Alabama, and wrote articles condemning lynchings in the south. As a woman of color standing up during times of extreme racism and gender oppression, she earned the mark of a prominent feminist and early civil rights pioneer. Her later work included defense of other anarchists and labor activists on trial for false charges, such as Sacco and Vanzetti and Tom Mooney and Warren Billings. Lucy spent her later years working with the International Labor Defense (a broad-based, but communist-founded, class war prisoners' support group, which has led to a historic fallacy that Lucy was a member of the Communist Party - she was not) and speaking at May Day events and rallies.

Lucy's biggest commitment as an activist was always with the anarchist labor movement, as she spent most of her energy engaging in anarcho-syndicalist struggles against capitalism and employers. Her outlook was grounded firmly in class analysis, and believed that issues such as racism were primarily the product of class inequalities. Alongside militant anarchist labor activists of the day she believed superficial divisions among workers must be put aside so that workers around the world could join together, strike and overthrow their corporate, and thus government, masters. Lucy was a member of the Knights of Labor, one of the first serious labor federations in the country, and a founding member of the International Working People's Association, an early anarcho-syndicalist labor organization. In 1905 she helped found the Industrial Workers of the World, which advanced some of the basic ideas of the IWPA, expanded them and led a wave of massive strikes and labor actions for decades.

Lucy Parsons' commitment to her causes, her fame surrounding the Haymarket affair, and her powerful orations had an enormous influence in world history in general and US labor history in particular. While today she is hardly remembered and ignored by conventional histories of the United States, the legacy of her struggles and her influence within these movements have left a trail of inspiration and passion that merits further attention by all those interested in human freedom, equality and social justice.

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A strike that is initiated, controlled, and settled by the workers directly affected is direct action...Direct action is industrial democracy.
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atuuschaaw
Post Posted: Thu Feb 09, 2006 8:31 am

Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 781
Location: an ahwangan
Thanks Elvis, but there is so much more that I didn't mention. As you can see, Lucy Parsons was a remarkable person and shit-disturber extraordinaire. And the numbers who have contributed to humanity are immeasurable. We have our own right here at Uncharted that I know work their ass off to keep this site well oiled and maintained. There are no monetary rewards for their dedication and long hours, but we are all richer because of them. Not to say they aren't rewarded, but it's just that their reward comes by way of the satisfaction that comes from helping people and that's really what it's all about! The fight for humanity is something that is never ending and it's virtually impossible to list all the achievements of all the women who have been inspirational to us all!

But I wanted to list a few more Sisters who have helped make a difference. Wink


And also, I urge everyone to drop by the site Voices from the Gaps (Women Artists and Writers of Color). Absolutely remarkable international community of talented artists. The program is physically housed in the University of Minnesota.

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"Speaking the truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act." George Orwell
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atuuschaaw
Post Posted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 9:39 am

Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 781
Location: an ahwangan
Really hot women have so much more to offer than the hollywood stereotype which has been marketed for as long as I can remember. The Real Hot 100 website is taking nominations. In their own words:
Quote:
Nominate a kick-ass friend (or yourself!) who is breaking barriers, fighting stereotypes, and making a difference in her community or the nation.

The times they are a changing, and it's about damn time! It is a shame we haven't yet evolved beyond these issues, but until society can transform into a real equal and just structure, the battles will continue. We're talking about women who are breaking the chains of media generated thought. These hot women aren't afraid to speak their mind. And they are actively pursuing change within their communities, their nations, and the world. These are the women I want on our side. These are the women I put faith in to help us bring some level of civility to this screwed up world. Just right off the top of my head, I know two I think should be nominated! Wink

The release of the really hot top 100 women will be in magazine form and the project is a protest of Maxim magazine's yearly Hot 100 list.

Quote:
Weíre tired of the media telling young women how to be "hot"! Maxim Magazineís annual "Hot 100" list exemplifies how young women are viewed in popular culture. The women featured in this leading menís magazine are chosen solely for their appearance.

The REAL hot 100 shows that young women are "hot" for reasons beyond their ability to look cute in a magazine.

REALLY hot women are smart. REALLY hot women work for change. REALLY hot women arenít afraid to speak their minds. And while some REALLY hot women might look awesome in a bikini, they know thatís not all they have to offer.


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"Speaking the truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act." George Orwell
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